Jason E. Carter

#theDigitalDomestic

  • Domestic #17, oil on canvas, 37.5 x 51 inches

  • Domestic #16, 2013, oil on canvas, 37.5 x 51 inches

  • Domestic #12, 2013, oil on linen, 15 x 20 inches

  • Domestic #14, 2013, oil on canvas, 15 x 19 inches

  • Domestic #10, 2013, oil on linen, 32.25 x 44.25 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #1, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #2, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #3, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #4, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #5, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Medusa’s Gaze #6, 2013, oil on linen, 12 x 12 inches

  • Ceiling Fan, 2012, oil on canvs, 12 x 16 inches

  • Domestic #11, 2013, oil on linen, 16 x 12 inches

  • Domestic #15, 2013, oil on canvas, 32 x 37.25 inches

  • Room 535, oil on canvas

Artist’s reception, Saturday, November 9, 5 – 8 PM

Artist’s talk, Thursday, November 14, 7:30 PM

Paul Kotula Projects is pleased to present #theDigitalDomestic by 2013 Kresge Arts fellow Jason E. Carter.  In this, the artist’s first solo exhibition, Carter presents a series of interior landscape paintings that explore the effects of digital culture through its defining light.

In writing about his work Carter states, “Light has a continual presence as subject and concept throughout the history of painting, but how it is understood and interpreted has evolved over time.  My current paintings are mediations on a new perception of light.  The digital age has brought a new age of illumination through glowing rectangles that demand our attention and are used with an almost religious fervor in our day-to-day activities and culture.  The sole light source for these paintings comes from a screen whose digital flicker manipulates and defines the space.  This artificial light not only allows us to see, but is also a source of information about the paintings themselves.”

Jason E. Carter’s interiors recall the figurative work of American painter Edward Hopper whose environments were often inhabited by a lone figure or two.  In Carter’s paintings, however, evidence of life is only through the remnant of a still emitting LCD screen.  The light transforms objects of familiarity and comfort into haunting desolate landscapes.  Like Hopper, Carter is reflecting on modern American life and subsequent themes of loneliness, boredom or even resignation, yet, like the I Phone, I Pad and computer screens lighting Carter’s spaces, his paintings are infused with seduction.  In one of Carter’s commanding works, a bed covered with an interlocking circle quilt appears like a series of roads leading towards mountains. Beyond lies a space fearfully dark, yet calling just like the computer screen that awaits its bedtime partner.

While Carter’s work explores the permutations of digital culture, his paintings employ traditional techniques and evidence of a growing interest in 17th-century varnishes.  In a recent article about Frieze Art Fair and the newly added Frieze Masters, Angela Westwater, a New York dealer, remarked about the growing interest in this craft, “It’s the antithesis of the anonymous hand of inkjet production.”

Jason E. Carter received his MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 2011 and his BFA from the College for Creative Studies in 1999.  He was awarded a Kresge Artist Fellowship in 2013 and is a recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant (2011).  His work is included in the collection of Cranbrook Art Museum and is featured in New American Paintings 107, Midwestern Competition 2013, juried by Eric Crosby, Assistant Curator, Visual Arts, Walker Arts Center, Minneapolis, MN.  Carter lives in Berkley, MI and works in Royal Oak, MI.